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News Source: thehill.com
Pelosi: Congress Will Block Trump's Arms Sales To Saudi Arabia
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Pelosi: Congress Will Block Trump's Arms Sales To Saudi Arabia

House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump's acting budget chief accuses Pelosi of holding debt ceiling increase 'hostage' Trump's acting budget chief accuses Pelosi of holding debt ceiling increase 'hostage' On The Money: Pelosi says no debt ceiling hike until deal on spending caps | McConnell pressures White House to strike budget deal | Warren bill would wipe out billions in student debt | Senate passes IRS reform bill MORE (D-Calif.) on Thursday vowed that President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew York activists go on hunger strike to advocate for ending solitary confinement Sanders says he would inform FBI about offers of foreign intel Sanders says he would inform FBI about offers of foreign intel MORE would have a fight on his hands as he presses to realize a sweeping arms sale to Saudi Arabia.

Speaking at a forum in New York, the Speaker said the House would soon vote to block the transfer of weapons to Riyadh, which the administration says is vital to protecting U.S. interests in the region amid escalating tensions with Iran.

"There will be a vote to remove any authority to make those sales to Saudi Arabia," Pelosi said Thursday night during an interview with Fareed Zakaria, hosted by Council of Foreign Relations. "This is something that we will fight, and we'll have bipartisan support to fight."

The comments came a day after Senate opponents of the deal secured the 51 votes needed to block the transfer in the Upper Chamber, after four Republican lawmakers went against the president on the measure. But it's unlikely that either chamber could find the two-thirds majority needed to override a presidential veto, as was the case last month when the Senate failed to override Trump's veto of increased military assistance to Yemen.

The State Department last month invoked an emergency provision under the Arms Export Control Act to push through the sale of 22 weapons to Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Jordan and other countries. The tactic allows the administration to sidestep Congress in finalizing a deal, worth roughly $8 billion, that includes Patriot missiles, drones, precision-guided bombs and other military support.

In the House, Rep. Ted LieuTed W. LieuDemocrats lash out at Trump's bombshell remarks Democrats lash out at Trump's bombshell remarks Trump hit with fierce backlash over interference remarks MORE (D-Calif.) introduced legislation Wednesday to block the entirety of Trump's wish-list of 22 arms sales. Another slimmer measure, targeting precision-guided bombs, was introduced by Reps. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineOvernight Defense: Latest on House defense bill markup | Air Force One, low-yield nukes spark debate | House Dems introduce resolutions blocking Saudi arms sales | Trump to send 1,000 troops to Poland Overnight Defense: Latest on House defense bill markup | Air Force One, low-yield nukes spark debate | House Dems introduce resolutions blocking Saudi arms sales | Trump to send 1,000 troops to Poland House Dems introduce resolutions to block Trump's Saudi arms sales MORE (D-R.I.), Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerOvernight Defense: Latest on House defense bill markup | Air Force One, low-yield nukes spark debate | House Dems introduce resolutions blocking Saudi arms sales | Trump to send 1,000 troops to Poland Overnight Defense: Latest on House defense bill markup | Air Force One, low-yield nukes spark debate | House Dems introduce resolutions blocking Saudi arms sales | Trump to send 1,000 troops to Poland House Dems introduce resolutions to block Trump's Saudi arms sales MORE (D-Va.) and Tom MalinowskiThomas (Tom) MalinowskiOvernight Defense: Latest on House defense bill markup | Air Force One, low-yield nukes spark debate | House Dems introduce resolutions blocking Saudi arms sales | Trump to send 1,000 troops to Poland Overnight Defense: Latest on House defense bill markup | Air Force One, low-yield nukes spark debate | House Dems introduce resolutions blocking Saudi arms sales | Trump to send 1,000 troops to Poland House Dems introduce resolutions to block Trump's Saudi arms sales MORE (D-N.J.).

Opponents of the deal are wary of granting any new assistance to Saudi Arabia in light of the Riyadh's involvement of the civil war in Yemen, which has killed countless thousands of civilians and created a dire humanitarian crisis. They're also loathe to help the same Saudi leaders who, according to the CIA, ordered the assassination and dismemberment of a vocal critic of their reign, the Washington Post contributor Jamal Khashoggi.

Pelosi, noting that Trump's first trip abroad as president was to Saudi Arabia, wondered what's driving the president's alacrity to strengthen ties with Riyadh, even as he's sought to punish more traditional allies with tariffs. She's also warning that Trump's arms deal "includes nuclear technology that he is transferring to Saudi Arabia."

"Follow the money. What's going on here?" she said. "And there's a question of who is financially benefiting from the nuclear part of the sales to Saudi Arabia. ... The case against Saudi Arabia — in terms of Yemen, in terms of Khashoggi, in terms of so much — that they should not be receiving these weapons sales is very strongly bipartisan in the Congress."

The debate comes amid increased tensions between the United States and Iran. On Thursday, two oil tankers were attacked in the Gulf of Oman, and hours later Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoUS military releases video it says depicts Iran removing mine before oil tanker explosion US military releases video it says depicts Iran removing mine before oil tanker explosion Overnight Defense: Pompeo blames Iran for oil tanker attacks | House panel approves 3B defense bill | Trump shares designs for red, white and blue Air Force One MORE accused the Iranians of orchestrating the "unprovoked" blasts, though he provided no evidence.

Those attacks came weeks after Trump heightened the U.S. military presence in the Persian Gulf, ordering new deployments of bombers, missile batteries and a carrier group to the region to combat what the administration has deemed new threats from an ever-aggressive Iranian regime.

Pelosi says she's been heartened by the noninterventionist position Trump has supported in the past — a message she reiterated Thursday night. But she also warned that the new saber rattling with Iran creates "a very dangerous situation," and hammered the president for his decision to pull out of the Iran nuclear agreement, adopted by President Obama in 2015. 

"You have to wonder why, if you do not want Iran to have a nuclear weapon, and then you say, 'Well they could have a nuclear weapon in 10 years under this agreement.' Well, without the agreement they could have one in one year. So what's the logic except some other issue? That is was negotiated by President Obama?" she said.

"I'm not going to accuse anybody of instigating anything, but we're not having a policy that would smooth the waters, so to speak," she added. "I think he probably knows that there's no appetite for war among the American people."