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News Source: thehill.com
Sanders Says He Backs Abolishing Electoral College
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Sanders Says He Backs Abolishing Electoral College

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders to join diabetes patients on trip to Canada to buy cheaper insulin The Hill's Morning Report - 2020 jitters hit both parties in the Senate Democrats warn push for border crossing decriminalization will prove costly in 2020 MORE (I-Vt.) on Thursday night said he favored getting rid of the Electoral College. 

Sanders was pressed on the issue at a presidential town hall hosted by the League of United Latin American Citizens. 

“It is hard to defend a system in which we have a president who lost the popular vote by 3 million votes, so the answer is yes,” he said.

Sanders had previously made similar remarks, but stopped short of calling for abolishing the voting body.

"Presidential elections cannot be fought out in just a dozen 'battleground' states," he told The Washington Post. "I believe that we need to reexamine the concept of the Electoral College."

A number of other Democratic presidential hopefuls including Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenSanders to join diabetes patients on trip to Canada to buy cheaper insulin George Conway renews 'pathological narcissist' attack on Trump in tweetstorm Trump teases social media summit before veering into attacks on press, Democratic challengers MORE (D-Mass.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSenate Democrats skipping Pence's border trip Harris, Schatz have highest percentage of non-white staff among Senate Democrats 3 reasons billionaire activist Tom Steyer is running for president MORE (D-N.J.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth Gillibrand3 reasons billionaire activist Tom Steyer is running for president Megan Rapinoe for president? She'd beat Trump Senate confirms Trump's 9th Circuit pick despite missing blue slips MORE (D-N.Y.), as well as South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegTrump teases social media summit before veering into attacks on press, Democratic challengers Buttigieg details plan targeting systemic racism The Hill's Morning Report - 2020 jitters hit both parties in the Senate MORE (D) have also called to eliminate the Electoral College.

And a recent NBC News–Wall Street Journal survey found that a majority of voters says the Electoral College system should be abandoned in favor of a national popular vote.

The push to consider moving to a national popular vote comes as several Democratic states in recent years have entered into the National Popular Vote interstate compact, an agreement that would essentially bypass the Electoral College if enough states join. 

The Electoral College has faced renewed scrutiny from the left after 2016 Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillary Clinton blasts Trump's 'weaponized fear and bigotry' Hillicon Valley: Trump officials to investigate French tax on tech giants | Fed chair raises concerns about Facebook's crypto project | FCC blocks part of San Francisco law on broadband competition | House members warn of disinformation 'battle' Sanders blasts CEOs and billionaires with 'anti-endorsement' list MORE lost the presidential election despite winning the national popular vote by just under 3 million votes. President TrumpDonald John TrumpControversial platform Gab slams White House for not inviting it to social media summit GOP senator: US should 'reevaluate' long-term relationship with Saudis Pelosi reportedly told Trump deputy: 'What was your name, dear?' MORE won the Electoral College, though, by a margin of 304 to 227.

Former President George W. Bush similarly lost the popular vote in 2000, but won in the Electoral College with 271 votes to Democratic candidate Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreWarren reintroduces bill mandating climate disclosures by companies Political world mourns death of Ross Perot The 'invisible primary' has begun MORE's 266.